Recent Changes

Sunday, June 29

  1. page home edited {maturing.jpg} {http://www.wikispaces.com/i/c.gif} Young people are constantly maturing as inf…
    {maturing.jpg} {http://www.wikispaces.com/i/c.gif}
    Young people are constantly maturing as information scientists. The projects at this website illustrate how information specialists can facilitate the development of information knowledge, skills, attitudes, and dispositions in children and young adults. Each project explores a particular information skill and describes inquiry-based learning experiences for two different grade levels that help students develop as information scientists. In addition, project participants will making suggestions for peer projects as well as adding an experience to a topic of their choice. For more ideas and information, check out the graduate level course Information Inquiry for Teachers and the project guidelines.
    Go to the Demonstration Projects or the archives (sidebar links) for examples of student projects.
    Add your topic and name below. Be sure to link to your project:
    Portraits of the Great Depression, Joshua Deisler
    Cultural Exchanges, Anne Hatke
    How Do Computer Programmers Make Computer Games?, Cathy King
    Forces, Andrea Brinkley
    Books, Author, and Me Barb Raymond
    Civil War - Tricia Arturi
    To learn more about this online course, contact Annette Lamb.

    (view changes)
    3:07 pm
  2. page Project- Leah Dresser edited Leah Dresser Grades 6 and 11 Women in History Inquiry Project Women in History: These lessons w…
    Leah Dresser
    Grades 6 and 11 Women in History Inquiry Project
    Women in History:
    These lessons were designed for sixth and eleventh grade social studies and history classes working in conjunction with the English departments on the topic of women in history and their contributions. Special attention will be paid to Susan B. Anthony and the 19th amendment.
    Inquiry Skill:
    As teachers and school media specialists, it is crucial to teach students inquiry skills. Inquiry skills are important because once basic inquiry skills are mastered, students are well on their way to becoming independent and lifelong learners. Callison writes, “According to Information Power, students who are independent learners pursue information related to personal interests, appreciate literature and other creative expressions of information, and strive for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.” (426).
    Search and Reporting skills and techniques are first learned in elementary school. Then the middle school builds upon those techniques. The high school then adds to the process. According to Callison, there are several important techniques. Some of the steps to research and reporting are paraphrased below:
    Understanding different classification systems, basic search techniques, and search engines, locating materials, using ideas, using research, presenting information and many more. The novice becomes expert by adding steps to the formula and inquiry process. They take what they have learned a little bit further. At the high school level, students learn to use advanced and extensive searches, develop and define terms, formulate hypothesis, and understands how to present the findings.
    In addition, Listening and Viewing skills are developed over time causing students to gain more experience. At the middle school level, it is important to “interpret what is seen and heard, recall, summarize, paraphrase, and extend what is listened to and viewed, and interpret meaning from many forms of literature.” At the high school level, students learn to “derive key information, interpret graphic sources for information, and understand the potential for products to inform, persuade, and entertain.” (91).
    There are key differences in how novice learners are different from expert. According to the Expert vs. Novice page of Information Inquiry, “An expert has a high degree of proficiency, skill, and knowledge in a particular subject. Experts are able to effectively think about and solve information problems.” A novice graduates to expert by going into greater detail, spending more time, and practice.
    All grade levels use search and reporting skills and listening and viewing skills. However, for this project, the focus will be on 6th grade social studies and 11th grade United States History. Callison writes of the importance of inquiry skills and references Stripling in Blue Book. He indicates, “Evaluation of sources is critical to inquiry in social studies” and “use of primary sources is an important component of inquiry in social studies” (178). The standards for 6th and 11th grade stress the importance of searching, reporting, listening, and viewing.
    Standards for Learning
    Many standards will be indentified in this project including standards from Social Studies, U.S History, English, and Standards for the 21st Century Learner.
    6th Grade
    Listening, Viewing, Searching, Reporting
    These Indiana content area standards are addressed:
    Social Studies
    Modern Era: 1700- Present
    6.1.16-Develop and compare timelines.
    Chronological Thinking, Historical Comprehension, Analysis and Interpretation, Research
    6.1.21, 6.1.22, 6.1.24
    Form research questions and use a variety of information resources to obtain, evaluate, and present historical data on the people, places, events, and developments in the history of Europe and the Americas.
    English
    Writing Applications:
    Analysis of Grade Level Text
    6.2.3, 6.2.4
    Indentify the purpose for writing. Identify the audience.
    Writing Applications
    6.5.2
    11th Grade
    Listening, Viewing, Researching, Reporting
    United States History
    Standard 3: Emergence of the Modern United States
    USH 3.6, 4.2, 4.3
    English
    11.2.2, 11.2.6, 11.5.1, 11.5.9
    Standards for the 21st Century learner
    Inquire, think critically, and ​gain knowledge
    Draw conclusions, make informed decision​s, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge.
    Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society.
    Pursue personal and aesthetic growth.
    6th Grade Information Standards:
    1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process
    1.1.6 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format.
    2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
    3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively.
    11th Grade Information Standards:
    1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process.
    1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge.
    1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions
    2.1.1 Continue an inquiry-based research process by applying critical-thinking skills.
    3.1.1 Conclude an inquiry-based research process by sharing new understandings.
    4.3.1 Participate in the social exchange of ideas.
    Student Audience
    My students are 6th graders from a medium sized, suburban, middle class school. There are twenty five students in the class and they love to learn, but only if I make it fun and interesting. My students have been lucky enough to have gone to an elementary school where information literacy was important. Therefore, they are right on target for where they should be in terms of literacy. As far as searching, reporting, listening, and viewing; the students can look up information, can recognize the library media resources, can participate in discussion following a story, and can recall, summarize, and paraphrase. The attitudes and interests are all over the place in this class. Some students are extremely studious, while others prefer to joke and have fun. Encouragement and fun motivate these students. This impacts my approach because I am always trying to find new ways to keep them interested in inquiry. In order to do this, I have to find topics and introductions which stimulate them. I will connect this learning experience to the real world because I will bring up how important it is for women and minorities to have rights. I will ask them to tell me of a time when someone wouldn’t let them do something which was unfair.
    My other target audience is a group of 11th grade students from a large, suburban, low to middle class school. There are 35 students in this class and it is harder to motivate them. They are ready to graduate and some think they already know everything. These students have the entry and novice skills they need to reach expert status, but only if I can motivate them. These students possess the skills of the middle school inquiry process in the areas of searching, reporting, listening, and viewing. The students are experienced in the media center and know how to research. In addition, they are at the age where many of them have jobs so they have experience with responsibility. Some are preparing for college while others are preparing to graduate and get entry level jobs. The attitudes and interests of these students cover the ends of the spectrum. Some of the students love learning, while others are here for a credit. This class is motivated by fun and encouragement as well. I think most people are motivated by encouragement. I try to encourage creativity even though I am not very creative. This impacts my approach because I try to provide assignments with various options for people who learn differently. Some of the students are more visual learners. I will connect this experience to the real world by asking the students how they would feel if they didn’t have the right to vote because they are almost old enough to vote and some of them may be old enough to vote. I will also ask them of a time when the encountered adversity.
    Collaboration:
    The school media specialist will collaborate with the Language Arts and Social Studies teachers on this project in similar ways for the 6th graders and 11th graders. We will have met on previous occasions to set the groundwork for this project. The Social Studies will have provided some background on the issue and the English teacher will have prepared rubrics for the paper portion of the paper. The specialist will be in charge of the activities in the media center as well as providing sample projects and examples. In addition, the specialist will remind students of the rules in the lab. The students will go to the computer lab to view various websites about the 19th amendment and women’s rights. For the most part, the media specialist will cover the inquiry standards and the classroom teachers will focus more on the standards and content. In addition, we will collaborate with community members who will come share their stories.
    Overview:
    This project will be two lessons on the topic of important women in history, one for 6th social studies and one for 11th grade United States History. I will take the role of the school librarian for both of the classes working closely with the social studies and English teachers. For the 6th grade project, we will be focusing on listening, viewing, searching, and reporting. The Social studies teacher will give some background information on the topic, show a video of Susan B. Anthony and the English teacher will go over some writing process information. Then the students will come to the media center to search for more information on the topic. They will then present their findings in a compare/contrast essay of life today with life for women in the 1900’s.
    For the 11th grade students, the same inquiry skills will be used, but they will have to be more detailed and push themselves more. I will still be taking on the role of the media specialist with the social studies teacher will focus on primary documents and sources including suffragette propaganda and steps which led to the 19th amendment. The English teacher will provide information on the writing process and the school specialist will help the students with research, citing sources, and presentations.
    Both lessons will take about two weeks to complete, from the beginning to the final project. Because both the English and Social Studies classes are giving time to this project the unit will only take two weeks to complete. In week one, the topics will be introduced, video will be watched, and questions answered. The searching phase also begins in this week. I will discuss the importance of making sure sources are credible and information is correct. We will also have a guest speaker come in and talk about women’s rights. The second week will be focused on the project and discuss their personal experiences with adversity.
    Background:
    So prior to the lesson students know:
    That Susan B. Anthony was a major reason for the 19th amendment. Students know the states which supported women’s rights and those who opposed it. Students are aware of how hard the suffragettes fought for the right to vote. Now they are ready for the lessons.
    Lesson Plans
    Lesson Plan for 6th Grade:
    Subjects:
    Social Studies and Language Arts/Listening and Viewing
    Time for the Unit: 2 weeks
    Objectives:
    Students will learn about arguments for and against the 19th amendment, including what states were in favor of women voting.
    Students will be able to get a firsthand account through video sources.
    Students will analyze a political cartoon.
    Students will reflect on life for women in the 1900’s versus life today including how life has improved and what improvements are still necessary.
    Students will visit the media center to search for information for their essay.
    Description:
    Students will already know some of the key players which led to the passing of the 19th amendment. They will have read some in the textbook. In this lesson, the teacher will ask students questions, and then show a short video clip about Susan B. Anthony. Students will also analyze a political cartoon. At the end of this lesson, students will visit the media center and search for information. Students will begin brainstorming ideas for a compare/contrast essay on life for women today with life in the 1900’s.
    Introduction:
    Ask the students to discuss a time when they felt they had a right to do something, but weren’t allowed. Ask them what they did and what they wish they would have done. Explain that it takes a special sort of person to stand up for what they believe in.
    Activities:
    Show a snippet of Susan B. Anthony’s biography from A&E.
    The media specialist will visit the link: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/gilded/jb_gilded_susanb_2_e.html and have students analyze the political carton of Susan B. Anthony working towards women’s rights.
    Discuss the cartoon and the implications of how women felt about getting to vote. Connect the video, readings, and cartoon.
    The media specialist will take students to visit the media center to search for information on women’s rights. A handout will be given of websites to visit.
    Teacher Materials:
    Paper, pencils, video of Susan B. Anthony, political cartoon, worksheet of websites to search, compare/contrast brainstorming sheet.
    Student Learning Materials
    6th Grade
    A graphic organizer will be handed out for student use on the compare/contrast essay. It was found at http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson275/compcon_chart.pdf.
    In addition, a handout of websites for the students to visit is included.
    {6th grade handout.pdf}
    Also, a checklist will be given to students so they know which areas to address in their essay. Project Guidelines Checklist-created at Project Based Learning.
    Here is the link: http://pblchecklist.4teachers.org/view.php3?id=312954.
    {compare checklist.pdf}
    Student Performance:
    The objectives of this lesson are to learn more about women who were important to United States History. Students will learn this through the video, cartoons, websites, and research. Students will be evaluated both on the website quiz and the compare and contrast essay. We will know that students will have mastered the lesson based on how well they are able to use evidence from the lessons and research in their essay in which they compare women today with women from the 1900's. We will evaluate the listening and viewing skills from the video and cartoons and the searching and reporting skills through the compare/contrast essay. The teacher and media specialist will work together to grade the compare/contrast essay using the following rubric:
    Criteria:
    1. The essay effectively compares life today to life for women in the 1900’s- 3 points
    2. The essay has an introduction, body, and conclusion-3 points
    3. Specific examples are used-3 points
    4. Evidence from research is given-5 points
    5. Grammar, Spelling, and Capitalization-3 points
    6. The essay is interesting and organized-3 points
    We will know students have mastered the lesson contents through class discussions, the graphic organizer, and the end product. The process will be assessed through the product.
    In addition, a quiz will be given over the websites to make sure that students visited all of the sites and read them.
    Here is the quiz:
    {quiz over websites.pdf}
    Student Model:
    Here is the quiz with answers.
    {quiz over websites answers.pdf}
    Lesson Plan for 11th Grade
    United States History and English
    Duration:
    2 weeks
    Objectives:
    Students will listen to a guest speaker who will discuss her role in the women’s rights movement.
    The media specialist will show a variety of posters and propaganda from World War II and the suffrage movement.
    The media specialist will take students to visit the media center to research a key event or person in women’s rights.
    Students will report their findings in a presentation.
    Students will listen and interpret other student findings.
    Description:
    Students have learned about important events for women in U.S History including women’s rights, the 19th amendment, and women’s contributions to the World War II effort. They will have read the textbook and have a general grasp of key events. A guest speaker will speak. Students will also analyze posters of women in World War II and the suffragette movement. Students must now decide which event or person they will research and why. Students will then report findings in a short presentation.
    Introduction:
    A guest speaker will come and share her knowledge of women’s rights and her role in World War II. Students will then ask questions.
    Activities:
    As a class, students will analyze and discuss posters from World War II and the 1900’s depicting women.
    The World War II poster can be found at: http://womenshistory.about.com/od/worldwariiposterart/ig/World-War-II---Victory-Home/Rosie-the-Riveter-.htm.
    We will visit the Library of Congress website to view pictures, posters, and cartoons from the suffrage movement at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/vfwhtml/vfwhome.html.
    Students will then visit the media center to research information for their project on their own.
    Students will then complete the project and present it.
    Students will listen and view classmate projects and grade them using a rubric handed out.
    Teacher Materials:
    Guest speaker
    Paper
    Pencils
    Posters
    Computer
    Grading Rubric for Project.
    Student Learning Materials
    11th grade Project Guideline Checklist for Oral Presentation
    Project Guidelines:
    One of the objectives of this lesson was for students to learn more about important women in U.S History. Through the lesson, they have listened, viewed, researched, and reported. Students must now combine what they have learned in class, through the cartoons, and research to create a project where the students decide on a key person in women’s history. The project should follow the checklist included. This checklist will serve as a tool to help with the evaluation of the oral presentation.
    http://pblchecklist.4teachers.org/view.php3?id=313092
    {11th grade check.pdf}
    Student Performance:
    The objectives of this lesson are to learn about women in history and then decide on a person or event of their choice related to the topic. In this way, they have a mixture of free and guided inquiry. The expectation of this lesson is to build student researching and reporting skills. The students research and then report. As a result, the other students benefit because they are improving listening and viewing skills. Instead of the same old lectures, the students have an opportunity to learn about important women and events through their classmates. Students will have to pay attention because they must honestly and accurately grade their peers. Students will grade the students on elements of the oral presentations. I will consider these rubrics when grading the projects to determine how well students listened and viewed the other projects. The main evidence of student mastery will come through the oral presentations.
    Here is the rubric students will fill in:
    {11 grade rubric.pdf}
    Student Models:
    I have attached a copy of a sample Power Point Presentation highlighting key events in Susan B. Anthony’s life.
    {Women in History Oral Presentation2.pptx}
    Feedback:
    I will determine the success of this lesson by the products the students turn out. In addition, I will ask the students to summarize their feelings toward this project on paper. I will ask them which aspects they liked and which they didn’t care for. In addition, I will ask them to provide alternative ideas for the projects. I will evaluate the unit with a collaborative teacher because we will be grading the compare/contrast essay and oral presentations together. The content teacher will be in charge of evaluating the content portion of the assignments, while I will evaluate the research portion. We will evaluate and decide whether the project will be used again. In addition, I would want other teachers who didn’t work on the project to evaluate it and offer suggestions. Some sample questions and discussion ideas include:
    Did the students effectively use inquiry?
    Did the assignments foster creativity?i
    Did the assignments allow students to stay focused?
    Are there steps we should add or subtract?
    This information will help build an evidence based program because our program will be built upon results. If a project isn't working, we will change it or eliminate it to find something better. In this way, students will reach their learning capacity. In addition, if we document our assignments and collaboration, we will know how to improve and expand on the projects.
    Lesson Comparison:
    Students differ in maturation and depth from one grade level to another. In this case, students in sixth grade have just begun their middle school career. They might be adjusting to not being in elementary school anymore. In some case, some of the students may be more mature than others in the sixth grade class depending on a variety of circumstances. I think that as sixth graders they are probably pretty concerned with what other people think and may be having hormonal changes. As a result, in the lesson plan, the end result for sixth grade students is a written essay and the high school product is an oral presentation. Callison indicates that students at the middle school level can give oral presentations, but for the purposes of this lesson, I think an essay would be better. Middle school students don’t have quite the same inquiry skill set as the high school students.
    The eleventh grade students are almost done with their high school career. They have finished their freshman and sophomore years and at this point, the students tend to know what direction their educational career is going to go. The students have an idea as to whether they are going to go to college or not. They also have developed quite a few informational inquiry skills. Juniors have developed more searching and reporting skills. In addition, instead of listening and viewing a video as the sixth graders did, the juniors will watch each other’s presentations to learn more about a variety of topics.
    The specific skills in the lessons evolve over time. Whereas in middle school, students can conduct basic search strategies, in high school students can conduct advanced search strategies when it comes to research. That is why for the sixth grade lesson; the students knew exactly what to look for in their research. They were given websites to visit and questions to answer. The students also knew that they needed to compare and contrast lifestyles in their essays. However, the high school lesson gave students more of an opportunity to search on their own and develop a topic related to the class lessons. They had a little bit more freedom and were able to “present information using multiple formats and styles that best fit the message and the audience.” (90).
    In order to move students from one level to the next level, it is important to use learner-centered strategies. According to Thompson, Licklider, and Jungst (2003) “a learner-centered approach to developing expertise requires purposeful and specific instruction.” They go on to say that we should help students with organization and major concepts, enhance retention and retrieval, and contribute to student development. As a result, I try to teach with a purpose and be as specific in instruction as I can while still allowing students to be creative and learn on their own. I try to find a balance to encourage inquiry. My approach is justified by student success with the lessons and learning.
    The scaffolding levels provided to the students at different grade levels is dependent on what they already know and what they want to know. For the middle school I would try to work with students on the knowledge they already have and are acquiring. I might provide an example of a similar situation. For the high school, I would probably encourage students to think more on their own and prompt them to question what they are learning.
    The expectations are different at the two levels. I would expect students to have better search strategies at the high school. That is why they didn’t get a website handout like the 6th grade students did. At the junior level, students should be able to search for information at a higher level. We analyzed a political cartoon for both grades, but I would expect the juniors to put a little bit more thought into the process. In addition, instead of the 11 grade students listening and viewing a videotape like the 6th graders, the expert students were required to learn from their peers.
    Student Information Scientist and Instructional Specialist:
    At the 6th grade level, the students are to determine how life was for women before they could vote and compare the lives which they lead to the lives of earlier women. They will draw conclusions based on the websites which they visit and the information which they find. They are definitely in need of more guidance. They share the results with the teacher and media specialist.
    On the other hand, the 11th grade students must decide who they want to learn more about. The students need to come up with their own questions and point of view. They need to determine credible websites and information. They will share their results in an oral presentation with their classmates and teachers.
    For both classes, the instructor plans the lessons and introduces the topics. The 6th graders receive more step by step instructions and the juniors are free to inquire. However, the instructor is available to answer any questions and help in the journey and investigation for both grades. In addition, the teacher will try to provide examples and introductions which help the students want to learn more.
    6th grade Information Standards:
    1.1.1- Follow an inquiry based process
    1.1.6- Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format.
    2.1.2- Organize knowledge so that it is useful
    3.1.3- Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively.
    11th Grade Information Standards:
    1.1.1- Follow an inquiry based process
    1.1.2- Use prior and background knowledge
    1.1.3- Develop and refine a range of questions
    2.1.1- Continue an inquiry-based research process by applying critical-thinking skills.
    3.1.1- Conclude an inquiry-based research process by sharing new understandings
    4.3.1- Participate in the social exchange of ideas
    For the 6th grade, the information standards used dealt mainly with organization and the inquiry process. Results were shared through writing. For the 11th grade students, they also followed the inquiry process, but they used prior knowledge and developed their own questions. They also had to apply critical thinking skills and exchange ideas in the end. Overall, the lessons were similar except that the 11th grade students had to take more initiative and explore more on their own.
    Here are the attachments including student learning materials, student performance, and student models or products. They are already included above, but I thought it might be easier to have them down here as well.
    Here are the 6th grade activities:
    {compare checklist.pdf}
    {6th grade handout.pdf}
    {quiz over websites.pdf}
    {quiz over websites answers.pdf}
    Here are the attachments for 11th grade:
    {11th grade check.pdf}
    {Women in History Oral Presentation2.pptx}
    {11 grade rubric.pdf}

    (view changes)
    3:04 pm

Monday, September 16

Monday, September 3

Friday, April 13

Thursday, April 5

  1. 3:27 pm

Monday, April 2

  1. msg Visual Literacy message posted Visual Literacy I love the PowerPoints you created. The visual literacy piece for this time period can be so powerf…
    Visual Literacy
    I love the PowerPoints you created. The visual literacy piece for this time period can be so powerful. Students can often feel removed from this subject matter because nothing simiar to what these people experienced as really happens. Using the pictures you incorporated will do a great job of drawing them in.
    8:01 pm
  2. msg KWL vs. Webquest message posted KWL vs. Webquest For some reason, once I entered your wiki, it wouldn't let me add discussion posts, so I will add h…
    KWL vs. Webquest
    For some reason, once I entered your wiki, it wouldn't let me add discussion posts, so I will add here.

    I'm not sure how much you will get from 6th graders using a KWL for the Dust Bowl since generally they have not touched on that time in history yet in the 6th grade. I've found that students actually gain little from KWLs and see them as more routine and dull. I think maybe the students might benefit a little more from a webquest on the subject. There are some really great webquests that are already available on the web or you could create your own.

    I found this one: http://www.cam.k12.il.us/ms/6th/dustbowl/

    This actually is for a 6th grade class which fits your grade level you are working with. You could modify it and make it your own!
    7:59 pm

Sunday, April 1

  1. page Portraits of the Great Depression, Joshua Deisler edited ... Peer Addition: Barb Raymond {Note Taking.docx} == == Peer Addition: Andrea Brinkley I…
    ...
    Peer Addition: Barb Raymond
    {Note Taking.docx}
    ==
    ==

    Peer Addition: Andrea Brinkley
    In order to adapt the themes of these units about the Great Depression for younger learners, I thought about how fourth grade students could use the inquiry skill of questioning. Daniel Callison (2006, pg 7) considers a cycle of questioning to be “the essence of lifelong learning.” Children are generally good at asking questions, but they need guidance and scaffolding in order to develop an inquiry. In this unit, the teacher will provide the overarching question- How was life different during the Great Depression? The students will develop more specific questions about different aspects of life as they make connections and comparisons to their own lives while reading a novel set during the Great Depression. In terms of McKenzie’s (1997) Questioning Toolkit, the teacher provides the essential question and the students generate subsidiary questions. At this level, though, the students will not be expected to know and understand the names for different types of questions. They will focus their attention on developing questions that will satisfy their curiosity about lifestyle differences between the 1930s and today.
    (view changes)
    9:08 pm
  2. page Portraits of the Great Depression, Joshua Deisler edited ... Peer Addition: Barb Raymond {Note Taking.docx} == == Peer Addition: Andrea Brinkley In…
    ...
    Peer Addition: Barb Raymond
    {Note Taking.docx}
    ==
    ==
    Peer Addition: Andrea Brinkley
    In order to adapt the themes of these units about the Great Depression for younger learners, I thought about how fourth grade students could use the inquiry skill of questioning. Daniel Callison (2006, pg 7) considers a cycle of questioning to be “the essence of lifelong learning.” Children are generally good at asking questions, but they need guidance and scaffolding in order to develop an inquiry. In this unit, the teacher will provide the overarching question- How was life different during the Great Depression? The students will develop more specific questions about different aspects of life as they make connections and comparisons to their own lives while reading a novel set during the Great Depression. In terms of McKenzie’s (1997) Questioning Toolkit, the teacher provides the essential question and the students generate subsidiary questions. At this level, though, the students will not be expected to know and understand the names for different types of questions. They will focus their attention on developing questions that will satisfy their curiosity about lifestyle differences between the 1930s and today.
    Like the sixth and tenth grade units, the Indiana English/Language Arts standards for Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Literary Text were considered for this unit. The following fourth grade standards apply:
    4.3.2 Identify the main events of the plot, including their causes and the effects of each event on future actions, and the major theme from the story action.
    4.3.3 Use knowledge of the situation, setting, and a character’s traits, motivations, and feelings to determine the causes for that character’s actions.
    4.3.6 Determine the theme.
    4.3.7 Identify the narrator in a selection and tell whether the narrator or speaker is involved in the story.
    Students will consider these story elements as they read the novel //Chig and the Second Spread// by Gwenyth Swain. This Young Hoosier Award winning book tells the story of a young girl growing up in southern Indiana during the Great Depression. As she faces the typical challenges of growing up and developing an identity, she also does what she can to help her family and neighbors deal with the local effects of the Depression. The book presents students with a positive role model and also provides historical context for the Great Depression in an Indiana setting. Although mini-lessons will be conducted throughout the reading of the book to address the English/Language Arts standards, the inquiry skill of questioning will be utilized mostly to meet a Social Studies standard. As students read and discuss the book, they will generate questions about the Great Depression that will lead them to other information sources that in order to build an understanding of the following Indiana Academic Standard for Social Studies:
    4.1.11 Identify and describe important events and movements that changed life in Indiana in the early twentieth century.
    Students will be working to meet the following Standards for the 21st-Century Learner:
    1.1.1 Follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real-world connection for using this process in own life.
    2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
    2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
    As the class reads and discusses the novel in a whole-group setting, students will make note of the differences between Chig’s life in the 1930s and their own lives. They will record their observations in a graphic organizer asking “How was life different during the Great Depression?” As they become aware of differences, they will develop additional questions about life during the Great Depression. They will then identify 3 important questions that they would like to explore more deeply. They will publish the information they find in a tri-fold brochure entitled Life During the Great Depression.
    After students have brainstormed questions and identified the three that they will focus on, they will rotate through stations containing the following books and resources:
    We the People: The Great Depression by Michael Burgan
    Welcome to Kit’s World, 1934 by Harriet Brown
    Children of the Great Depression by Russell Freedman
    The Depression and New Deal by Robert S. McElvaine
    Dust to Eat: Drought and Depression in the 1930s by Michael L. Cooper
    Great Depression entry in Encyclopedia Britannica Online www.school.eb (school password required)
    As students find information to answer their questions, they will record it on their “Questions and Sources Sheet” along with bibliographic information for the sources they used. Students will then use this information to create their brochures, which will be assessed with a checklist.
    The unit could conclude with a viewing of the film Kit Kittredge: An American Girl. Students would identify effects of the Great Depression that are depicted in the film and compare and contrast Kit’s urban environment with Chig’s rural one.
    {Great Depression Graphic Organizer.pdf}
    {Questions and Sources Sheet.pdf}
    {Life During the Great Depression Brochure Grading Checklist.pdf}
    Callison, D., & Preddy, L. (2006). The blue book on information age inquiry, instruction and literacy. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.
    McKenzie, J. (1997). Questioning toolkit. Retrieved March 31, 2012, from http://questioning.org/Q7/toolkit.html#anchor177354

    (view changes)
    9:07 pm

More