First Grade lesson plan for Animal Inquiry Flipbook Project

Indiana Academic Standards:
Science
1.4.3 Observe and explain that animals eat plants or other animals for food.
1.4.4 Explain that most living things need water, food, and air.
Language Arts
1.4.5 Identify a variety of sources of information (books, online sources, pictures, charts, tables of contents, diagrams) and document the sources (titles).
1.6.2 Write in complete sentences.
Standards for the 21st Century Learner:
1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.4.1 Monitor own information-seeking processes for effectiveness and progress, and adapt as necessary.
1.4.4 Seek appropriate help when it is needed.
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
2.2.4 Demonstrate personal productivity by completing products to express learning.
3.1.1 Conclude an inquiry-based research process by sharing new understandings and reflecting on the learning.
3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively.
4.1.8 Use creative and artistic formats to express personal learning.


Lesson Overview:
First grade students will become information scientists as they question, research, and learn about an animal. They will create a flipbook to share the information they learn. They will use questioning to decide what they want to learn and share about the animal they choose. They will also use information search to answer their questions and refine them as necessary.
Method:
Day 1- Brainstorm a list of animals students want to learn about. Brainstorm a list of questions to research about an animal. Students choose one animal to research. Students decide what information they would like to learn about their animal. They will copy three questions to research in the media center. Teacher will hand out and discuss the first grade checklist so students are aware of the expectations and can monitor their own progress.

Day 2-3- Media center- Model how to find information in non-fiction books by using the table of contents. Model how to scan websites to find information about animals. Model how to record information and revise questions on the 1st grade research chart. Model thinking skills and revising questions. The teacher/media specialist should also model how to record the titles of books or websites where students find their information so proper credit can be given.

Day 4- Model how to take the information on the chart and write complete sentences. Students use their research charts to write three complete sentences.

Day 5-6- Model how to make a flipbook. Take a large piece of paper and fold it lengthwise. Then fold it two more times to create eight boxes. Open it back up to the first fold. Cut on three of the fold lines only to the middle of the paper, creating four flaps. On the first flap, write the name of the animal. Under the first flap draw a picture of the animal. On the next three flaps, write the three sentences students learned about their animal. Under the flaps, draw pictures that go with the sentences.

Day 7- Share the flipbooks with the class.

Day8 –The teacher initiates a conversation with students about the entire project. What did students like/not like. What did students learn about? How did their questions change from the start of the lesson to the time that they actually were engaged in the research? Why did they change their questions? Where did they find the best information? This is a time for students to reflect on the inquiry process and the project.

1st grade checklist.doc
1st grade research chart.doc


Fourth Grade lesson plan for Indiana Animal Inquiry PowerPoint Presentation

Indiana Academic Standards:
Science
4.4.3 Observe and describe that organisms interact with one another in various ways, such as providing food, pollination, and seed dispersal.
4.4.4 Observe and describe that some source of energy is needed for all organisms to stay alive and grow.
Language Arts
4.2.2 Use appropriate strategies when reading for different purposes.
Example: Read and take notes on an informational text that will be

used for a report. Skim a text to locate specific information.
Use graphic organizers to show the relationship of ideas in the
text.
4.7.12 Make informational presentations that:
· focus on one main topic.
· include facts and details that help listeners focus.
· incorporate more than one source of information (including speakers, books, newspapers, television broadcasts, radio reports, or Web sites).
Standards for the 21st Century Learner:
1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.3.1 Respect copyright/intellectual property rights of creators and producers.
1.4.1 Monitor own information-seeking processes for effectiveness and progress, and adapt as necessary.
1.4.4 Seek appropriate help when it is needed.
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information
3.1.1 Conclude an inquiry-based research process by sharing new understandings and reflecting on the learning.
4.1.8 Use creative and artistic formats to express personal learning.

Lesson Overview:
Fourth grade students will become information scientists as they question, research, and learn about an animal that is native to Indiana. They will prepare a six page PowerPoint presentation about an animal that is found in Indiana. They will use questioning to decide what they want to learn and share about the animal they choose. They will also use information search to answer their questions and refine them as necessary. The PowerPoint will include a title page, a reference page, and the information they find.

Method:
Day One- Brainstorm a list of animals native to Indiana. Students choose one animal to research. Students decide what information they would like to learn about their animal. They will write four questions to research in the media center. Teacher will hand out the animal inquiry checklist so students are aware of the expectations and can monitor their own progress.

Day 2- Media center- Review with students how to find information in non-fiction books by using table of contents, index, and headings along with how to use the INSPIRE database and the internet effectively. Students will record their findings on the animal research chart. The teacher/media specialist will remind students that they may want to change their questions as they find information. This is meta-cognition or thinking about thinking. The teacher should model this thinking for students before they begin the research. The teacher/media specialist should model how to fill out the chart as students find information and revise their questions. The teacher/media specialist should also review with students how they should cite the sources where they find their information.

Day 3- Students use the slide layout chart to design their PowerPoint presentation. The teacher will also help students correctly cite their sources for the last slide.

Day 4-6- Computer Lab- Students create their PowerPoint presentations using the information they found and recorded on the research chart. The teacher/media specialist offers assistance and guidance where necessary.

Day 7- Present slideshow to the class.

Day8 –The teacher initiates a conversation with students about the entire project. What did students like/not like. What did students learn about? How did their questions change from the start of the lesson to the time that they actually were engaged in the research? Why did they change their questions? Where did they find the best information? This is a time for students to reflect on the inquiry process and the project.

Animal Inquiry Checklist.doc
animal research chart.doc
slide layout.doc

Lesson Comparison and Inquiry Skills Information

The inquiry skills my lessons cover are questioning and information search. In both of my lessons the learners start by asking questions. These questions will help them focus their research. As Callison states in The Blue Book, “Student ownership of the questioning process leads to students becoming content experts if they continue to question, probe, and explore.” (503) Harada also states in Curriculum Connections Through the Library that forming good questions is essential to critical thinking (52). In the beginning, students use brainstorming to come up with initial questions to research about their animals. After they have time to look for answers to the questions, they are able to revise their questioning. Often times when we look for answers to a question, we find that there are other questions we should be looking for first. I provide an opportunity in my lessons for students to revise their questions when they are working in the media center. Students in both grade levels are using meta-cognition when they are thinking about and reevaluating their questions.
After students have decided on their initial questions, they begin the next inquiry skill of information search. In the fourth grade lesson, students are free to search in the media center for information. They are encouraged to use books as well as web resources and the INSPIRE database to find information. According to Callison fourth grade students are able to use information to build sound explanations (176). The fourth graders are again using meta-cognition by evaluating the sources they are using to find the information they need. They are thinking about the process and making revisions as necessary. In the first grade lesson, the students will use books that have been pulled off the shelves before they arrive as they will require more time for research then the fourth graders. They also are not ready to wade through all the books on the shelf in the animal section. They will still be evaluating books, just not as many. The first graders are also involved in meta-cognition when they look at and decide which books to use to answer their questions.
I found it difficult to limit my standards. So much of what we do with children is based in the standards. With both lessons I chose to include some science standards because of the nature of the lesson. I used general standards about living things that I believe would be covered in this lesson, but I don’t have specific examples. It really depends on the students’ research. The language arts standards that I included are addressed in the final projects. I found that most of the Standards for the 21st Century learner applied to both grade levels. With adaptations, many lessons can be used with several grade levels.


Sources:
Curriculum Connections Through the Library. (2003). Westport, Connecticut: Libraries Unlimited.
Callison, D., & Preddy, L. (2006). The Blue Book on Information Age Inquiry, Instruction and Literacy. Westport, Connecticut: Libraries Unlimited.