Fourth and Sixth Grade use of Dewey Decimal to find resources.


Students in all grades need to know how to obtain information, apply it to previous knowledge and demonstrate understanding.Teaching students the "How to" process needs to be easily understood so students learn the process and continue to use it to become more proficient every year. Students will learn or refresh themselves to the process of how to locate a book on the shelf before using OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) to search their topic. Fourth grade will use a Dewey web site to review the information and then students will use call number cards in class to identify where the book would be located in the library. Next students would conduct a search in OPAC for their topic and then find the resource in the library. Fourth grade will be researching the Iroquois Six Nations and the sixth grade class will be working on a weather project. The lessons would be different between the two classes as the sixth grade has had previous experience using OPAC and locating books. The lesson would take less time for sixth grade as it is just a refresher for most students. When they finish their review of fiction genre, they will begin a search for their science project. Students will be choosing any aspect of weather they are interested in and searching for information using the OPAC. Reviewing often with students increases their expertise with searching the OPAC.

The following lessons are for grades four and six. Both grades will use the OPAC to look for resources but on a different level. Students in fourth grade are just learning to use the OPAC and will need to learn about identifying the various types of searches they can use. Students in sixth grade have been using standard searches but will be taught how to perform a subject browse to narrow their results. The fourth grade class is comprised of 18 students who are new to using the computers and using the downstairs juvenile and high school library area. Students need to log on to the computer before they can access the OPAC. Fourth grade students are still new to logging onto the computer so their lessons will be shorter to accommodate their need for more time. The sixth grade classes also have 18 students in each class. They are more familiar with the keyboards and can log onto the computer faster but some students still struggle with using the keyboard efficiently. Some students become frustrated on two levels when we use the computer as some students are not as familiar with the keyboard and some students get impatient when they have to wait for others to catch up. Continued practice in logging on and using the OPAC should help students in learning the process they need to become more technologically proficient.

Both units for fourth and sixth grade are teaching students the research process. The sixth grade students are going to be beginning the third stage of research acquisition of information after five lessons and the fourth grade class will be beginning the third stage after eleven lessons. Both groups will be learning the research process through a variety of activities that are similar but taught at different paces and with different methods and organizers. Using Kuhlthau's prewriting Information Search Process (ISP) students are using the brainstorming strategies (Initiation) to determine what they know and what they want to know. Students will decide on a topic after investigating background knowledge and interests (Selection). Students begin exploring how to find information available to them (Exploring Information) and move onto identifying if they are moving in the right direction with their search for information (Forming Focus). As students collect information, the next step, they record information from various sources recording information on organizers to help them focus on the questions they have. As students collaborate with fellow students they assess the information search process to determine if they still need information or can begin to create their final project with the information they have. (Assessing the information search process) (Callison p.41).

Assessment for students achievement comes from students quizes in the form of a quiz using the turning point responder system. Questions address whether students have understood how to use the OPAC to search for and locate books. Fourth grade students will be quized more on knowing how to locate books once they have found them using searches and call numbers. Students will produce a finished product to demonstrate their new understanding of their respective topics. Fourth grade students will create an Inspiration web identifying aspects of clothing, food and housing, storytelling, historical events and leaders or Iroquois Six Nations information. Fourth grade will also be creating a power point slide with several other students who are investigating similar topics. The Sixth grade students will create a poster in powerpoint or a comic using the Comic Life program.

Collaboration with the fourth grade teacher provided guidance for the unit on Iroquois Six Nations. Students will begin studying the Iroquois culture and learn about storytelling in language arts. Through the library, we are providing a program for students to listen to and ask questions to two educators from the Iroquois Museum located in Howes Cave, NY. They are going to provide storytelling and information about the culture past and present. Students are writing their own stories and will also be telling the stories in class. For a library connection, we will be investigating mostly cuture and the Confederacy to add to what students are learning in social studies.


The fourth grade class has begun working on their project by collecting some background knowledge of the Native American lifestyle and culture. Each student has created a question about a specific aspect of native culture and will begin gathering information soon. This lesson is directed to the fourth grade class that is beginning to use the computers to search for books for pleasure reading as well as for research. This lesson is a bridge between taking notes from several print sources to looking for their own sources on a particular subject. Students have decided on a specific aspect of Iroquois culture and will be identifying search words that will help them with a subject search. Students will be searching using the most common searches: subject, author, title and series, but will recognize that subject searches will be the most effective search strategy.

Week of
November 18
Grade
Fourth
Class
Williammee
Day
3
Period
6th
Time
11:30 - 12:00
Materials
worksheet used to conduct searches for author, title, subject and series.
Pencil
Objectives
Library Awareness Skills:
Behavior and Etiquette of a good library User
Lifelong Learning Skills:
Identify where and how to find information to answer questions.
Information Problem Solving:
Understands arrangement and can find materials in the Elementary Library
Use technology to identify information sources
Procedure
1. Welcome students to Library and take attendance.
2. Students will be asked what resource in the library will help them find information if they were researching a project. Students should acknowledge the OPAC.
3. Students will be directed to identify how to find the OPAC on the computer. I will have the smart board on and students will have visual and written directions to log on.
4. Students will locate the LMC on the school homepage and click on LMC and then electronic resources. Students will be asked to identify the OPAC link. They should respond it is the first one.

Students will be asked what OPAC stands for. Students should respond Online Public Access Catalog. (The definition is written next to OPAC)
5. Students will be directed to click on the OPAC button and find themselves on the search page. Students will be asked to click on the search tab and tell me what they find. Students should respond there are several types of searches.
Standard, Beginner, Advance, AR/RC, Subject and Author browse.
Today we are going to look for books using the standard search tab. Students will be asked to click on standard search and notice they can enter a keyword and specify how to look with the anywhere box. We will use the dropdown menu for the anywhere box and locate author, title, subject and series to look for books. Students will review title (Stellaluna), authors (Dr. Seuss), series, ( Magic Tree House) and subject (Native Americans). Using the worksheet students will conduct searches using each of the search terms and fill in the titles and call number for the book they found.
When students finish they can look for books or read a magazine until the bell rings.

Analysis of lesson

Standards
AASL: Skills
1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.
1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools fro accessing information and pursuing inquiry.

Dispositions in Action
1.2.2 Demonstrate confidence and self-direction by making independent choices in the selection of resources and information.
Self- Assessment Strategies
1.4.2 Use interaction with and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.
2.4.1 Determine how to act on information (accept, reject, modify)
2.4.4 Develop directions for future investigations.

NAME
Practice locating resources in the library using OPAC.
Log onto OPAC and find one book using each of the search terms listed below. Use the suggested key words for your first search and then choose your own keyword, subject, series and author for the second search.


Keyword search
Call number
Title of book
Author
Creech


Title
The Giver


series
The Time Warp Trio


Subject
Indians







Keyword search
Call number
Title of book
Author



Title



series



Subject







4th grade unit for Iroquois Six nations first three weeks




This lesson is for a sixth grade class. This lesson is connecting fiction genre searches with a need to teach students how to conduct a narrower search, students will be identifying how to conduct a search for these specific genres of fiction. Students are covering fiction genres in ELA and students will be reinforcing types of literary texts as well as reinforcing skills needed for searching for information. Students already know how to conduct a standard search but will be learning how to conduct a subject browse to narrow their results and will be practicing the skill with the genres, historical fiction, fantasy, realistic fiction, science fiction and mystery. This lesson will help students practice a skill they will be using in a different way next week when they begin searching for resources in the library for their weather topic. Students will begin searching for information on their science topic after completing an A-Z list of weather terms and watching some extreme weather videos to stimulate previous background knowledge.

Week of
November 6 & 4
Grade
Sixth
Class
Carter Arnot
Day
1-2 5-6
Period
10th
Time
2:09 – 2:48
Materials
Book/s:
Worksheet
Objectives
Library Awareness Skills:
Responsibility for materials and ability to check out and return materials.
Lifelong Learning Skills:
Recognizes genres of fiction Adventure
Information Problem Solving:
Use technology to identify information sources sources
Locates and uses electronic online sources OPAC
Procedure
1. Welcome students in to Library take Attendance.
2. Inform students we will be investigating various forms of literature and we will be starting with adventure. Students will be asked What type of events would I find in an adventure book?
Students would identify maybe danger, high risk behavior, etc.
3. Students will be directed to take their worksheet in their folder and log onto OPAC. Students will be asked to click onto the search box and identify what types of searches they can make. Students should identify that they can use standard, advanced, beginner, Accelerated Reader, subject browse and author browse.
4. Students will be directed to use the subject browse first. They will be asked to type in adventure. A box will pop up that will help students narrow their search for adventure books. I will review the list of adventure categories that students can choose from and discuss the appropriateness of each category. Students will be asked to decide which categories will give them the best results and they may choose several types of adventure categories. Students should notice that they appear on the side. Once students have narrowed their search they can click on the search button and the sources that fit their description will appear. Clicking on the juvenile fiction, my search results give 47 choices.
5. Students will be directed to go back to the LMC homepage by clicking on the button at the top. Now students will be directed to just use the keyword search entering adventure and changing the anywhere to subject. Students will be asked to hit search.
Students will be asked how many results they found. Students should respond 172.

What sort of materials are found? Students should identify that there are magazines and videos and books from the elementary and high school library. How can they tell? Students should respond by the call letter into.
Students will be asked which is the better choice if they are looking for a fiction book to read. Students should respond the subject browse. Students are encouraged to write down one title that is interesting to them and then go to the next fiction genre and look for other titles to practice using subject browse .
6. Students will be encouraged to look for books from their list for personal reading when they are finished.

Standards
AASL: Skills
1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.
1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools fro accessing information and pursuing inquiry.

Dispositions in Action
1.2.2 Demonstrate confidence and self-direction by making independent choices in the selection of resources and information.
Self- Assessment Strategies
1.4.2 Use interaction with and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.
2.4.1 Determine how to act on information (accept, reject, modify)
2.4.4 Develop directions for future investigations.

ELA
2A
Students read a variety of literature of different genres: picture books; poems; articles and stories from children's magazines, fables, myths and legends; songs, plays and media productions; and works of fiction and nonfiction intended for young readers.
2B
Students recognize some features that distinguish the genres and use those features to aid comprehension.














NAME

Write the name and call number of at least two books that fit into each genre identified in class.

Adventure

Fantasy


Historical Fiction


Mystery

Realistic Fiction


Science Fiction


6th grade weather unit first three weeks