Beth Wade
574 Virtual Inquiry
Project 2

Media Impact

Media Impact: Portrayals of History 10th Grade

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Mrs. Wade's Honors English sophomores use inquiry to produce their own historical films.


Page Links:


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10th Grade Self-Reflection:


12th Grade Self-Reflection:



10th Grade Checklist:


12th Grade Checklist



Visit the online resources I've provided for my students!

At Moodle, you will find rubrics, inquiry topics for journals, notetaking templates I've created, as well as links to Citation Machine and Fact Check.org. (You may be prompted to type in wade for the enrollment key/password FCHS at Moodle, which is our helpful online English classroom. --You will be logging in at the 'as a guest' prompt.)


Enrollment Key: wade
Password: fchs
(If necessary, after clicking continue, click on Wade 10 to choose the correct course at English Department. It's easier than it looks, and sometimes you don't have to type in anything.)

Moodle Link:

Objective:


Tenth grade students will use inquiry and film analysis to research historical events and collaboratively produce films and presentations based on their findings.

Summary:


Students will discuss movies—such as Titanic, The Crucible, Gatsby--based on actual events and how those movies have shaped their perceptions of those events. Students will be assigned groups to work with to make a collaborative, multimedia research project. This is project is primarily meant for English classes but has a cross-curriculum appeal that applies to history courses.

Students will research the time period of their choosing, come up with two research questions to guide their inquiry, as well as revise the questions after their inquiry has begun. Students will gather information from a variety of print and electronic sources, evaluate those sources, and then synthesize the information. After that, students will analyze the results according to their two research questions and then present their findings in a video skit or Power Point presentation. They will also present an informative speech in front of their peers, complete with visual aids.

Production of the video will include a focus on their research findings and what actually transpired in that historical event. Along the way, students will reflect on their inquiry process. Finally, they will reflect on which resources and lessons were the most beneficial to them. In addition, students will self-evaluate their contributions to the process and product, focusing on what they may do differently in the future to improve both the process and product. This data will be collected and analyzed by their teacher and school media specialist, to be used in consideration of assessment of this inquiry product, including their final grades.

Information Scientists:

sophomores honors English students at Franklin County High School, in Brookville, Indiana

Analysis of Student Audience:


These students are a mix of economic backgrounds. Because this is a college-bound class, all are usually fairly highly motivated to learn and excel in academics. Almost all of the students have internet access at home. However, they are certainly on the novice end of the novice-to-expert spectrum, as they have little or no inquiry practice during the previous year or two. As a result, lessons on gathering, evaluating, and documenting sources are crucial.

Projected timeline for inquiry process: two to three weeks


Day 1: Students will receive inquiry packets; discuss criteria for grading and timeline for projects.
Day 2: Students will brainstorm for topics. Students will brainstorm to find two questions to guide research. Students will receive plagiarism packets to be read for discussion later in the week. Quesioning is an important part of inquiry for the informational scienctist (Callison and Preddy 170).
Day 3: Students will discuss evaluating and gathering sources.Students will learn how to make correct bibliographic entries, according to MLA format.
Day 4: Students will practice using correct bibliographic format (skills lesson). Student will watch a demonstration of the use of Inspire databases by their teacher.
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Media Specialist Becky Stewart reviews Inspire with students.
Day 5: Students will watch the media specialist demonstrate use of Inspire. The media specialist and teacher will give guidance to students as they gather materials in the school media center. *The school media specialist and teacher will also give guidance about using keywords and subject terms as a skills lesson. At this time, students will be using information (viewing, listening, reading) so that they can later synthesize it, which are steps 4 and 5 of the Big 6 inquiry model (Callison and Preddy 44).
Day 6: Students will learn note-taking skills. Students will collaborate in the library to reflect on their research questions. Students will continue to gather materials in the school media center.

Day 7: Students will collaborate in the school media center, using their research questions to guide their inquiry and gathering materials, both print and electronic. Students will also be introduced to online tools available to them, such as concept maps, citation building websites, and note-taking templates, and rubrics. Rubrics help the student self-access their progress (Stripling 166).

Day 8: On days 8 -11, students will meet in their classroom, where a computer lab is available. However, students may make use of the school media center for any additional materials or guidance that is needed. In the classroom, students will write in their inquiry journals about the progress they are making with their research. Reflection though journals is important in helping students revise their inquiry focus. In addition, it aids the teacher and school media specialist in revising their focus for future inquiry projects (Callison and Preddy 173, 226). Students will use the computers in the classroom to aid in their search for information. Students will also use the online tools available for making citations and bibliographic information.

Day 9: Students will turn in their individual bibliography entries, to be checked by the teacher and/or school media specialist. Students will analyze examples of plagiarism, as well as take an online tutorial about properly citing information and quotations from sources. 031.JPG
Day 10: Students will collaborate in their groups for ideas for their video, speech, and visual aid. Students will have their note cards checked by the teacher, to ensure correct citation format with their facts.

Day 11: Students will meet with their groups and discuss any last minute plans that need to be made. Students will also write in their inquiry journals about their use of online tools. They will also reflect on and evaluate their information sources. The school media center will be available to them for any last minute print sources needed. (Most of these students will elect to meet over the weekend, at a parent’s house, to film their video. However, students may film in the classroom, if needed.)

Day 12: Students will meet to revise and proofread their presentations.

Day 13: Students will present their speech and video creations. The school media specialist will review the finished products with the teacher.

Day 14: Students will reflect on the process, the value of sources and lessons, and the product. Students will also reflect on how the process has affected movie viewing and/or film selections in the future. This reflection and the act of generating of new questions differentiates the project from linear research, because it is recursive in nature (Stripling 7).

Day 15: Students will present their videos to parents at the school open house.

Teacher/Media Specialist Response to Student Feedback:

After tabulating the results of the student reflection, the teacher and media specialist determined that more emphasis needs to be paid to evaluating web sites for authority. In addition, a separate criteria needs to be applied to citing use of photographs, as well as attributing partial quotes in documentation.

Collaboration:


Collaboration between school media specialist and teacher takes place before, during, and after the process. Collaboration with the technical expert takes sporadically before, during, and after the process to ensure the technical support and access is readily available. This collaboration leads to innovative thinking, drawing on the strengths of the collaborators. It also promotes a student-centered learning environment (Callison and Preddy 150).

Collaboration Evidence: e-mail correspondence between the teacher and school media specialist:
(Collaboration photos present throughout wiki.)
Beth,

I just reviewed your unit and the final products. I was very impressed. You have done a thorough job from beginning to end. I appreciated the cross curriculum aspects of the project. Your project made history come alive. I also enjoyed collaborating with you regarding the research skills you were emphasizing. I particularly appreciated the fact that you were actively promoting INSPIRE. I only have two very small suggestions for the future. Perhaps you can encourage those students with internet at home to register for Inspire. It is a great site and all Indiana residents need to use it! Maybe your students could earn an extra credit point. Of course, that excludes those without access, so maybe that is not a good idea. My only other thought was perhaps introducing boolean logic, and I would be most happy to assist with this.

The projects were great! You are absolutely on the right track for meaningful, creative student directed learning. You've laid the groundwork for future inquiry with skills that will carry over in all their classes. I can't wait to hear what our next project will be!!!

Becky


Product:

Grade 10 Production of Bonnie and Clyde at Youtube:

Bonnie and Clyde

Grade 10 Power Point of Roaring Twenties (Original shows imbedded video):


21st Century Literacy Standards for Grade 10:

Indicator 1.1.1 – With guidance, use an inquiry-based process for expanding content knowledge, connecting academic learning with the real world, and pursuing personal interests.

1.1.3: -- Generate specific questions to focus the purpose or the research.
-- Refine questions to provide a framework for the inquiry and to fulfill the purpose of the research.


1.1.4: -- Identify and prioritize possible sources of information based on specific information needs and strengths of different information formats.

1.1.6: -- Take notes using one or more note-taking strategies, including reflecting on the information (for example, graphic organizers, two-column notes).

2.1.6: -- Revise work based on ongoing self-assessment and feedback from teachers and peers.

-- Edit for grammar, language conventions, and style.

-- Cite all sources and use specified citation formats.



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A student brainstorms with Beth Wade, English teacher, about possible sources for her inquiry project.


Indiana English State Standards and Benchmarks, Grade 10:
Standard 5
10.5.9: Research Applications
Write or deliver a research report that has been developed using a systematic research process (defines the topic, gathers information, determines credibility, reports findings) and that: uses information from a variety of sources (books, technology, multimedia), distinguishes between primary and secondary documents, and documents sources independently by using a consistent format for citations.

Student synthesizes information gathered from a variety of sources, including technology and one’s own research, and evaluates information for its relevance to the research questions.

Student demonstrates that information that has been gathered has been summarized, that the topic has been refined through this process, and that conclusions have been drawn from synthesizing information.

Student demonstrates that sources have been evaluated for accuracy, bias, and credibility.

Student organizes information by classifying, categorizing, and sequencing, and demonstrates the distinction between one’s own ideas from the ideas of others, and includes a bibliography (Works Cited).

Unites States History:
State Standard USH.4.7

Describe technological developments during the 1920s and their impact on rural and urban America. (Economics; Geography; Individuals, Society and Culture)

State Standards USH 4.3

Explain how America reacted to a changing society by examining issues associated with the Red Scare, Prohibition, the Scopes Trial, the changing role of women and African-Americans, the Ku Klux Klan, the Palmer Raids, the National Origins Act, and restrictions on immigration. (Government; Economics; Geography; Individuals, Society and Culture)


Media Impact: Portrayals of Tourism 12th Grade

Information Literary Skills:


Students will work on using and synthesizing information, steps 4 and 5 of the Big 6 research model (Callison and Preddy 44, 45).

Informational Scientists: seniors in Academic 12 English at Franklin County High School in Brookville, Indiana

Analysis of Student Audience:

These students are college bound seniors who are enrolled in a college-bound English course. They are motivated to learn and excel in academics. Seniors in this class have had a number of inquiry practices and are ready to branch out on their own and write a 5-8 page paper independently, following MLA style, including revising and editing. In addition, they are ready to deliver a speech on their findings, complete with audio and visual aids, such as Power Point and/or music and sound effects. At this point in the course, a review of bibliography entries and parenthetical citations is not necessary. However, students will have access to examples of various bibliographic formats.

Objective: Seniors will access and evaluate a variety of sources to determine the best tourism spot for a personal inquiry project. They will present their findings in a research report and oral presentation.

Summary:

Students will discuss a vacation spot they would like to travel to, as well as commercials and media stereotypes that have contributed to their perceptions. They will conduct an inquiry about their favorite destination and present their findings in a paper and accompanying speech. The speech can include a multi-media presentation. Students will choose a foreign country—or a destination with a different culture than their own—that they are interested in visiting someday.

Students will begin by brainstorming to come up with at least two questions to guide their research. Students will gather information from a variety of print and electronic resources, evaluate those sources, and then synthesize the information. After this, students will analyze the results, according to their two questions, and present those findings in an individual speech in front of their peers, complete with visual aids. 026.JPG During their inquiry process, students will reflect on how a variety of print and electronic resources can help them not only with this project, but also in the future, at college. They will deliver a short talk to their peers about the best way to use a print or electronic resource of their choosing. Along this inquiry journey, students will also reflect on their inquiry process.

Finally , they will discuss which resources and lessons were the most beneficial to them. In addition, students will self-evaluate their progress as an informational scientist. Additionally, they will address what they would differently in the future. This data will be collected and analyzed by their teacher and school media specialist, to be used in consideration of assessment of this inquiry product, including their final grades.

Projected timeline for inquiry process: two to three weeks

Day 1: Students will receive inquiry packets. Given a checklist, students will discuss criteria for grading and a timeline for projects. ChecklistsStudents will brainstorm to find topics of interest.

Day 2: Students will brainstorm to come up with at least two questions to guide their research. Students will also review avoiding plagiarism and quoting sources accurately, which is a crucial skill in information inquiry (Callison and Preddy 470-474).

Day 3: (Skills Lesson 4) Because these students are skilled in bibliographic format, they will proceed to meet in the school media center for this skills lesson. The school media specialist will help them select reference books and electronic resources to review in a short talk with their peers. A focus will be placed on how these materials will help them in the future.

Day 4: Students will present their reference book talks to the class. Day 5: Students will meet in the media center to gather and evaluate resources for their paper and speech. The teacher and school media specialists will meet with them individually to provide guidance and feedback about their inquiry process. This ‘self talk’ is an integral part of the inquiry process, especially important for individual projects that do not involve collaboration with peers (Stripling 142). During this stage, extra consideration will be paid to guide students to critically evaluate websites promoting tourist spots.

Day 6: Students will continue to meet in the media center to gather and evaluate resources, as well as synthesize information.

Day 7: Students will continue to meet in the media center to gather and evaluate resources, as well as synthesize information.

Day 8: Students will meet in the classroom but will continue to have access to the internet for additional materials. Students will reflect on their progress and use of resources in a journal entry, as well as revise their inquiry questions. 030.JPGDay 9: The teacher will answer any questions that may arise about bibliographic information. Bibliography entries should be finished at that time. Checkpoints, such as bibliography entry and note card due dates, help students manage large projects (Stripling 164). Students will be synthesizing their materials through note-taking or note-taking materials.

Day 10: Students will reflect on the inquiry process in a journal. They will also reflect on how their assumptions about the selected country may be different than the reality. Students will be synthesizing their materials through note cards or note-taking templates. (*Note-taking templates, created by the teacher, are available to them online as part of a skills lesson.)

The teacher and school media specialist will be available to guide them in their note-taking process. Learning how to differentiate important from unimportant information is a an important inquiry skill. Additionally, learning how to take notes from different formats of sources is becoming increasingly important (Callison and Preddy 551). Students will also begin working on their rough drafts and speeches.

Days 11, 12: Students will be working on writing their rough drafts and revising their work. Since this inquiry project takes place near the end of the course, students will be taught ways to proofread their mechanics, sentence structure, and syntax to revise their work.

Day 13: Students will present final drafts.

Day 14 or selected future date: Students will present their speeches. Since many students find presentations exciting, it is important to remind them to focus on content, as well as the visual element of their speeches. The speech rubric, available online, will help them determine if they are synthesizing their information accurately (Stripling 166).

Celebrating Inquiry with Other Audiences: After the oral presentations, seniors will share their findings and advice for travel with seniors from other classes by participating in an online forum on Moodle.

Lesson Comparison: Since college-bound seniors are facing the highest level of state standard expectations, they should be nearing the expert level by the time of this inquiry lesson. Their experiences with inquiry in the past will help them build confidence in working more independently than they did as sophomores. In addition, they will get experience in coaching others in the skills lesson, and the social interaction during the oral presentations and forums is an important skill in cognitive development. The sophomores, by comparison, will also experience cognitive apprenticeship through their cooperative student groups (Callison and Preddy 319). Finally, choices for senior inquiry projects are more truly following Callison's free inquiry model than are the sophomore topics, which are guided by the teacher and media specialist. In both cases, by presenting their products to peers and/or parents, they are celebrating their learning, which is an essential element in the free inquiry model (Callison and Preddy 52).

21st Century Literacy Skills for 12th Grade:


Standard 1: Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge.

Indicator 1.1.3: Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
--Review the initial information needed to clarify, revise, and refine the questions.

Indicator 1.1.4: Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer the questions.
--Identify the value and differences among potential resources in a variety of formats.

Standard 2: Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge.

Indicator 2.1.6: Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
--Assess how tone and choice of language impact content in a range of media.
--Cite ideas and quotes using official style formats.
--Employ various strategies for revising and reviewing their own work.

Indiana English State Standard, Grade 12:
Standard 5
12.5.9:
Write academic essays, such as an analytical essay, a persuasive essay, a research report, a summary, an explanation, a description, or a literary analysis that: develops a thesis, creates an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context, includes accurate information from primary and secondary sources and excludes extraneous information, makes valid inferences, supports judgments with relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details,uses technical terms and notations correctly, and provides a coherent conclusion.


Teacher and School Media Specialist Response to Reflection:


In the future, more emphasis needs to be placed on employing technical skills in visual aids for speech. Also, the conclusion of the paper and speech need to reflect findings of guided research questions to a greater degree.

Collaboration: Collaboration takes place between the teacher and school media specialist before, during, and after inquiry, with several days spent in the media center to gather and evaluate materials. Back in the classroom, students can still conference with the school media specialist as needed.


E-mail correspondence between teacher and school media specialist:
Becky,
I've attached a write up of the mini-lesson for the senior level of the media/travel inquiry project. Once again, thanks for collaborating with me on ideas for meeting the literary standards for grade 12. Your suggestions of possible reference books to review were indispensable. I really appreciate the help and guidance you've given me, and I think the students will benefit the most!
Beth

Beth,
It has been a pleasure collaborating with you. Your seniors are now ready and capable of tackling any and all research topics. Job well done!

Becky


Product:

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Visual Aid to Accompany Tourism Speech on Jamaica


Work Cited:

Callison, Daniel, and Leslie Preddy. The Blue Book on Information Age Inquiry,

Instruction, and Literacy
. Westport, Connecticut: Libraries Unlimited, 2006.


Indiana Department of Education. Indiana's Academic Standards and Resources. 29 October 2009

<http://www.indianastandards.org/standardSummary.asp?Subject=eng&Grade=10&Standard=>.

Standards for the 21st Century Learner in Action.Chicago: American Association of School

Librarians, 2009.


Stripling, Barbara K., and Sandra-Hughes-Hassell (Eds.). Curriculum

Connections Through the Library
. Westport, Connecticut: Libraries Unlimited,

2003.